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When librarians become researchers: the creation of international culture of knowledge sharing beyond the frontiers
Presentation Type: 
Poster
Language: 
English
Babel revisited: a taxonomy for ordinary images in a bilingual retrieval context

With the large volume of digital images now accessible on the World Wide Web, users searching for images can be overwhelmed by many factors. Too many available images, images indexed with an incomprehensible vocabulary or one that is too specialized to be useful are but a few examples of issues leading to frustration. In addition, language barriers still prevent Web users from retrieving the images they need. This contribution presents the preliminary results of a study proposing to explore the behaviours of image searchers from four different linguistic communities. The purpose of this preliminary study is to examine queries formulated by image searchers to learn about the terminology used and evaluate how this terminology can be eventually incorporated into the development of a bilingual taxonomy for digital image indexing. Forty participants from four different linguistic communities (English, French, Chinese and Russian native speakers) were asked to write the queries they would use to retrieve ten images that were shown to them consecutively. Then they were invited to fill out a questionnaire on their behaviours as an image searcher on the Web. The results of this research allowed the acquisition of knowledge of user terminology standards and an assessment of how that terminology might be integrated in the development of a bilingual taxonomy for improved indexing of ordinary digital images. Moreover, since language barriers regularly prevent users from easily accessing information of all kinds, the bilingual taxonomy will constitute a clear benefit for image searchers who are not overly familiar with images indexed in English, which is still the dominant language of the Web

Presentation Type: 
Talk
Language: 
English
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KEYNOTE ADDRESS : Information organizing: an evolutionary and development framework

Information behaviour has emerged as an important aspect of human life, however our knowledge and understanding of it is incomplete and underdeveloped scientifically. Our understanding of information behaviour and the sub-process information organizing behaviour is largely contemporary in focus. In this presentation Professor Spink discusses an evolutionary and developmental framework for information behaviour and information organizing from her recent book Information Behaviour: An Evolutionary Instinct (2010, Springer) by incorporating related findings, theories and models from evolutionary psychology, cognitive archaeology, cognitive neuroscience and developmental psychology. In her presentation, she argues that information behavior and information organizing are important instinctive socio-cognitive abilities for all humans, that can only be fully understood with an evolutionary and developmental perspective. Professor Spink’s presentation addresses four important research questions. Firstly, what is the evolutionary, biological and developmental basis for information behaviour and information organizing behaviour? Secondly, what is the role of instinct versus environment in shaping information behaviour and information organizing behaviour? Thirdly, how have information behaviour and organizing capabilities evolved and developed over human species? Fourthly, when and how do information behaviour and in particular information organizing abilities emerge in young children? An evolutionary and developmental approach lays the foundation for a more holistic perspective on information behaviour and information organizing behaviour, and opens many new research directions.

Presentation Type: 
Talk
Language: 
English
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Presentation Audio: 
Presentation Visual: 
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